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Oak trees.
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AZ Pinstriped
AZ Pinstriped


Joined: Mar 16, 2009
Posts: 136

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 3:08 pm    Post subject: Oak trees. Reply with quote

What is the nearest location to Phoenix where I can find oak trees?
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fjlarry
Obstacle Crusher
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Joined: Jan 08, 2008
Posts: 1840
Location: Glendale

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 6:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Mountains south of Tucson has oak trees. Sonoita/ Patagonia area. I'm sure there's some closer but this area has lots of them. There's some on the way to Globe also.

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Swedeswamp
Dusty Truck
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Joined: May 02, 2009
Posts: 95
Location: Northern Minnesota

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 7:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Why the heck ya look'n fer Oak trees?? I have acres of them!

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AZ Pinstriped
AZ Pinstriped


Joined: Mar 16, 2009
Posts: 136

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 8:51 am    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Swedeswamp wrote:
Why the heck ya look'n fer Oak trees?? I have acres of them!

It is a Serbian thing. We still celebrate Christmas by the old calender (January 7th). Oak branch is Serbian Christmas tree. In the old country one is supposed to go to woods and cut one out late on the Christmas eve and place it in front of the home entrance door so it is there when the sun comes up on the Christmas morning. Everybody I know usually goes to Sedona to get the branch and I was trying to find a closer place.
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bushwacker
Expeditioneer
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Joined: Sep 22, 2009
Posts: 1205
Location: NW Phoenix

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 9:34 am    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

You can find Oak Trees in most slightly wooded areas just north of town. Off of HWY 17 North and about 10miles off the Hwy 69 West exit you can take Poland Junction Road up to the top and find them right off the road. Watch out for Bear though they hang close to the road in that area.
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Swedeswamp
Dusty Truck
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Joined: May 02, 2009
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Location: Northern Minnesota

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 11:01 am    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Interesting tradition, ya just never know what you can learn on this web site! Good luck with the Oak and, " Mir Bozji! Hristos se Rodi!" (hope that's right!)

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Chigoe
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Joined: Jan 03, 2008
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Location: Sunny Scottsdale

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 4:29 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

FYI...



The oak family (Fagaceae) includes over 600 species which are distributed across the temperate zones of North America, Europe, Asia, and even south into Polynesia. Oak trees often have historic/aesthetic value and, in many places, they are important for timber. Oak wood is durable, tough, and attractively grained. It is especially valued in shipbuilding, flooring, furniture, railroad ties, barrels, tool handles, and veneer. The bark of some oaks has been used in medicine, tanning, and for cork and dyes. Acorns, the fruit of oak trees, have long been a source of human and animal food.

According to McDougall (author Seed Plants of Northern Arizona), north central Arizona has eight species of true oak. Identifying individual species can be tricky as they are known to intergrade (hybridize) with each other. In my experience, four Quercus species are fairly common in our general area. These are: Emory oak (Quercus emoryi); Arizona white oak (Q. arizonica); Gambel oak (Q. gambelii); and shrub live oak (Q. turbinella). The other four species: canyon live oak (Q. chrysolepis), net-leaf oak (Q. reticulata), wavyleaf oak (Q. undulata), and Q. dunnii are less common.

Emory oak has dark green, oblong, shiny leaves with spines at the margins (leaf edges). The bark is black on mature trees. It can exist as a shrub or a tree, but can reach a height of 40 feet or more and trees often have very upright growth habit. It is drought-deciduous (loses it leaves during the May-June dry season) and grows between 3,000 to 8,000 ft elevations.

Arizona white oak has pale green leaves which often have marginal spines, but may also be smooth or rounded. The bark is whitish on mature specimens (hence the name). It can exist as a shrub or a tree, but can reach a height of 40 feet or more and trees often have a spreading/rounded growth form. It is drought-deciduous and grows up to 7,500 ft elevation.

Gambel oak is one of the easiest species to recognize having deeply lobed, “typical” oak leaves. The bark is grayish in color. It also can exist as a shrub or a tree, but can reach a height of 40 feet or more. It is the only winter deciduous oak we have and grows between 5,000 to 8,000 ft elevations.

Shrub live oak (or scrub oak) leaves are very similar in appearance to Arizona white oak. It seldom grows higher than 8 to 10 ft and is a major component of the interior chaparral vegetation type. It is drought-deciduous and grows up to 8,000 ft elevations.

Canyon live oak has medium green leaves with marginal spines. The leaves are rounder than those of Emory oak. I have not seen a large, native-grown tree specimen in Arizona. However, I have seen some young specimens at the base of Mingus Mountain near Cottonwood. This oak species is very common in the mountain ranges of California and southern Oregon. Scattered populations occur in the mountains of southwestern Nevada and in parts of western and central Arizona, and Mexico. Fossil evidence suggests that this oak was much more widely distributed to the east during the late Wisconsin and early Holocene.

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AZ Pinstriped
AZ Pinstriped


Joined: Mar 16, 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 4:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Swedeswamp wrote:
Interesting tradition, ya just never know what you can learn on this web site! Good luck with the Oak and, " Mir Bozji! Hristos se Rodi!" (hope that's right!)

Uistinu se rodi. Thank you
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Swedeswamp
Dusty Truck
Dusty Truck


Joined: May 02, 2009
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Location: Northern Minnesota

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 4:46 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Hmmm?

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Swedeswamp
Dusty Truck
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Joined: May 02, 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 4:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

opps! sorry General that wasn't meant for you! ya slipped one in on me while i was replying to Chigoe's info!

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AZ Pinstriped
AZ Pinstriped


Joined: Mar 16, 2009
Posts: 136

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 5:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Oak trees. Reply with quote

Chigoe wrote:
FYI...



The oak family (Fagaceae) includes over 600 species which are distributed across the temperate zones of North America, Europe, Asia, and even south into Polynesia. Oak trees often have historic/aesthetic value and, in many places, they are important for timber. Oak wood is durable, tough, and attractively grained. It is especially valued in shipbuilding, flooring, furniture, railroad ties, barrels, tool handles, and veneer. The bark of some oaks has been used in medicine, tanning, and for cork and dyes. Acorns, the fruit of oak trees, have long been a source of human and animal food.

According to McDougall (author Seed Plants of Northern Arizona), north central Arizona has eight species of true oak. Identifying individual species can be tricky as they are known to intergrade (hybridize) with each other. In my experience, four Quercus species are fairly common in our general area. These are: Emory oak (Quercus emoryi); Arizona white oak (Q. arizonica); Gambel oak (Q. gambelii); and shrub live oak (Q. turbinella). The other four species: canyon live oak (Q. chrysolepis), net-leaf oak (Q. reticulata), wavyleaf oak (Q. undulata), and Q. dunnii are less common.

Emory oak has dark green, oblong, shiny leaves with spines at the margins (leaf edges). The bark is black on mature trees. It can exist as a shrub or a tree, but can reach a height of 40 feet or more and trees often have very upright growth habit. It is drought-deciduous (loses it leaves during the May-June dry season) and grows between 3,000 to 8,000 ft elevations.

Arizona white oak has pale green leaves which often have marginal spines, but may also be smooth or rounded. The bark is whitish on mature specimens (hence the name). It can exist as a shrub or a tree, but can reach a height of 40 feet or more and trees often have a spreading/rounded growth form. It is drought-deciduous and grows up to 7,500 ft elevation.

Gambel oak is one of the easiest species to recognize having deeply lobed, “typical” oak leaves. The bark is grayish in color. It also can exist as a shrub or a tree, but can reach a height of 40 feet or more. It is the only winter deciduous oak we have and grows between 5,000 to 8,000 ft elevations.

Shrub live oak (or scrub oak) leaves are very similar in appearance to Arizona white oak. It seldom grows higher than 8 to 10 ft and is a major component of the interior chaparral vegetation type. It is drought-deciduous and grows up to 8,000 ft elevations.

Canyon live oak has medium green leaves with marginal spines. The leaves are rounder than those of Emory oak. I have not seen a large, native-grown tree specimen in Arizona. However, I have seen some young specimens at the base of Mingus Mountain near Cottonwood. This oak species is very common in the mountain ranges of California and southern Oregon. Scattered populations occur in the mountains of southwestern Nevada and in parts of western and central Arizona, and Mexico. Fossil evidence suggests that this oak was much more widely distributed to the east during the late Wisconsin and early Holocene.

I found part of this earlier online. Up until today I only knew of one type only.
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